Article of the Day

Coffee with Startups – Steve Blank

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In an existing market directly compare your product against the incumbent and specifically describe the problems you solve and why Company x’s products do not.

~ Steve Blank

Tips for Customer Discovery

Getting customers involved in product development and innovation is at the core of customer discovery for startups.  We found the power in this model more through accident than insight at my first startup, E-Markets, back in the 1990s.  We had concepts for Internet-based electronic applications, even prototypes, but the actual products we launched were developed in concert with prospective customers.

The customer discovery process is simple, but hard work.

  • Form assertions or hypotheses around the problem that your product solves, the product, and various components of your anticipated business model
  • Test these assertions or hypotheses with prospective customers
  • Verify where you’re right, learn where you’re wrong, and adjust your assertions and hypotheses

The customer discovery process may or may not involve a prototype or minimum viable product, but the overall idea is to work to increase the richness of conversations and dialogue with prospective customers as you proceed.  If all goes well you not only refine your ideas about your startup business, you even build your early customer base.

Some tips for the customer discovery process include the following.

Don’t provide leading information – You are trying to learn from prospective customers in these early conversations, not necessarily sell them something (yet).  Therefore, you don’t need to start out pitching them as if they are investors or as if you have your product or service completed and ready for sale.  Reveal your story and that of your startup business in small bits and let the prospective customer lead the conversation in directions you may not have anticipated.

Start with the problem, not the solution – If you are at the stage of having developed a startup business concept, you no doubt have identified a solution to a problem.  You are also probably excited and energized with your solution.  Resist leading conversations with prospective customers about the solution, however, and work to lead conversations with the problem.  Your task is to understand the problem at a depth and detail beyond what anyone else does.  This understanding will help shape a successful solution more effectively than any technical expert.

Don’t stop with verifying what you know – You not only need to learn where  your wrong about some part of your idea, you also need to learn what you don’t know – you don’t know what you don’t know.  So use open-ended questions.  If answers to many of your questions are simply ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ you’re not asking questions the right way. You’re looking for information, feedback, and ideas that may surprise you in some way, the gold nuggets of insight that will help your form up a more solid startup business.

Ask for references – Don’t end any conversations with a new contact without asking for references.  Even if an interview of a potential customer doesn’t yield new insights, it can at least yield new contacts and an expansion of your network.  How do you make contact with 25 prospective customers and/or industry experts?  Start with four people you know.  If each of them gives you four additional contacts you’re up to twenty four after you contact them.  Only one more to go!

Customer discovery will be different for each business. The process of testing assertions and hypotheses and modifying detailed ideas about the business is a continuous process that takes a lot of hands-on/in-front-of-people work.  For many startup businesses it is the most critical step in discovering a sustainable business model.

What types of contacts will help you with your startup business?  How do you find them?  What are the most important issues for you to explore?  Do you have contacts that could help someone else?