Article of the Day

In divisive election year, voters agree: Infrastructure needs fixing – Agri-Pulse

“Economic development provided the basis; Lincoln said much later, that would allow every American ‘an unfettered start, and a fair chance, in the race of life.” – From Team of Rivals, Deloris Kearns Goodwin’s book on President Abraham Lincoln and his cabinet.

Key Infrastructure for Disruptive Agricultural Technologies

Sara Wyant from Agri-Pulse asked me to participate in a forum this week on rural infrastructure.  Roads, railroads, locks, roads are each examples of infrastructure important to agriculture and rural economies.

The middle part of the U.S. produces a high proportion of U.S. ag output, much of it big and bulky, but efficiently ships those products to customers on the coasts and around the world.  In many ways it was the transportation ability of the Mississippi and associated rivers that enabled the economic development of the U.S. beyond the east coast. and the ability to ship products efficiently has remained part of the competitive advantage of the U.S. even as other modes of transport have developed.

As part of a panel asked to address disruptive innovation and agricultural infrastructure, I identified four key inputs for disruptive agricultural technologies.

  1. Electricity – Electricity is a key input to agricultural technologies involving microchips, controller, sensors, and a range of technologies that will form the basis of robotics and artificial intelligence taking root in agriculture.  Hydroponic and aquaponic technologies are now being used to grow vegetables and deliver them locally twelve months per year.   Use of software and drones is playing an increasing role in crop scouting.  Microchips are being placed in many traditional pieces of agricultural machinery, enabling them to connect to other devices and enabling better decision making based on new streams of data.  In Iowa and most of the Midwest, electricity infrastructure and cost levels are quite good.  Iowa, for example, has a strong group of rural electric cooperatives that are poised to play a key role in emergence of agricultural technologies.  Grade: A.
  2. Water – The FAO estimates that only 0.003% of earth’s water is available for human use.  Yet it takes a lot of water to produce agricultural products.  Water use and water quality are huge issues for agriculture and certainly a key input for disruptive agricultural technologies.  Indoor aquaculture systems are  a key emerging example of technologies that involve water.  Can we produce fish in a sustainable way and relieve pressure on wild catch and environmental issues related to sea and pond-based aquaculture production systems?  Can we use technology to improve water quality in agricultural production systems?  Water in the rural Midwest is largely available, but water quality in streams related to agricultural production is a challenge.  In addition, the water treatment infrastructure of many rural communities could be challenged by both emerging regulatory and consumer issues. Grade: B.
  3. Bandwidth – The Internet of Things has many possibilities for agricultural technologies, with devices, machines, and even crops and livestock connected to the cloud for sensing, monitoring, analysis and intervention.  The possibilities, however, are limited in broad swaths of rural America for lack of bandwidth/cell phone signal.  Given a geographic footprint that’s big and population that’s small, there are inherent constraints to investment in significant infrastructure for rural areas, but clearly there needs to be some sort of breakthrough in wireless technology for agricultural technologies that find value through connecting to the cloud in rural areas.  Grade: C.
  4. Human Talent – The core input for disruptive technologies in agriculture is people.  Whether entrepreneurs who invent and commercialize technologies, or the people that work with them, human talent is key.  The potential for technology is unlimited because it is linked to human imagination, which has no boundaries.  The Agricultural Entrepreneurship Initiative and Iowa State Univeristy has impact in this through the work our graduates do in rural communities, as well as other higher education institutions.  But that’s only part of the population.  I fear our public schools, especially at the high school level, are not preparing rural young men and women as well as they could for careers of impact in their communities.  Grade: ?.

What do you think are the key pieces of infrastructure for agriculture’s future?  Which parts of that infrastructure do you anticipate will be important for your career and entrepreneurial aspirations?